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Dictionary

German Grid-Storage Capacities

The Energy Mix of a country is a political policy statement, or actual situation, concerning the range of electricity-generating energy sources used by that country. Germany has recently announced a phasing out of its nuclear reactors. It proposes an increase in renewable energies to make up the shortfall, to avoid an increase in reliance on fossil fuels.

German electricity generation 2015

Germany has decided to phase out its nuclear power by 2020. As a result it has lost a third of its nuclear power in the period 2010-15. Although renewables nearly doubled their contribution to German electricity generation in this same period, the use of coal has increased slightly, with the consequence that CO2 and other air pollutant emissions have increased.

The contributions of the various energy sources to electricity generation in Germany in 2015 (in Terawatt-hours):

Energy sourceGenerated power (TWh)Percent of totalChange over 2010
Coal272.244.0%+3.5%
Natural gas62.09.5%-31.0%
Fossil oil6.20.95%-29.0%
Nuclear91.814.2%-34.7%
Renewable181.528.0%+81.3%
Other (incl. waste inc.)33.25.1%-10.2%
Total646.9100%+2.2%

German renewable electricity generation (2015)

Nearly one-third of German electricity is obtained from five renewable energy sources. In particular, wind energy has doubled and solar has tripled their contributions in the five years from 2010-15.

The contributions of the five renewable energy sources to electricity generation in Germany in 2015 (in Terawatt-hours):

Energy sourceGenerated power (TWh)Percent of totalChange since 2010
Wind79.29.1%+109.5%
Biomass44.66.9%+50.7%
Photovoltaic38.75.7%+230.7%
Hydropower19.03.1%-14.3%
Domestic waste5.81.0%+23.4%
Total187.329.0%+78.7%

The Energy Mix of a country is a political policy statement, or actual situation, concerning the range of electricity-generating energy sources used by that country. Germany announced in 2011, following the Fukushima disaster, a phasing out of its nuclear reactors by 2022. It proposes an increase in renewable energies to make up the shortfall, to avoid an increase in reliance on fossil fuels.

German energy mix 2014:

The energy mix in Germany in 2014: (in Terawatt-hours)


Energy sourceGenerated power (TWh)Percent of totalChange over 2000
Coal264.843.2%-7.3%
Natural gas58.39.5%+1.0%
Fossil oil6.01.0%0.0%
Nuclear97.115.8-13.7%
Renewable160.526.1%+19.6%
Other27.34.4%+0.4%
Total614100%+6.5%

Energy sourceGenerated power (TWh)Percent of totalChange over 2000
Fossils341.254.3%-5.7%
Nuclear97.115.5%-14.0%
Renewable162.525.9%+19.3%
Other27.04.3%+0.4%
Total627.8100%+8.9%
Net Export35.65.7%+5.8%

Non-renewable Energy (2014)


Energy sourceGenerated power (TWh)Percent of totalRelative change over 2000*Real change over 2000 (Twh)
Coal274.443.7%-6.8%-17.0
Natural gas61.19.7%+1.2%+11.9
Fossil oil5.70.9%-0.1%-0.2
Total341.254.3%-5.7%-5.3

* Change in percentage of total electricity production from this source


Renewable Energy (2014)


Energy sourceGenerated power (TWh)Percent of totalRelative change over 2000*Real change over 2000 (Twh)
Wind57.39.1%+7.5%+47.8
Biomass43.36.9%+6.6%+51.7
Photovoltaic36.15.7%+5.7%+36.1
Hydropower19.63.1%-1.2%-5.3
Domestic waste6.11.0%+0.7%+4.3
Total162.425.8%+20.8%+124.6

* Change in percentage of total electricity production from this source


Data Source: Arbeitsgemeinschaft Power Generation 1900-2016